Friday Fun – What’s Your Story About?

79166e5ccf5a075922344ed186712fbb

“What’s your movie going to be about?”

“Well, it’s kind of complicated to explain, but here I go. It’s about pizza and life, and well wait, let me start over. It’s about a guy who buys a slice of pizza that changes his life. You see, blah blah blah…”

“Uh huh….”

“Blah blah blahhhhhh. Well I guess I’m still figuring some of it out right now. Blah blah…”

“Ohhh…. cool.”

“That was really confusing wasn’t it? Let me try again, I can explain it better.”

“No! I mean, no. I totally understood. I’d love to read it when you’re done.”

That was painful, wasn’t it? I had a great writing professor who used to tell everyone the same thing whenever they asked what he was writing. He’d say, “I’m writing a story about a one-legged man who hops across America.” I think he he had the right idea.

 

Quote of the Day – John Carpenter

the_10_best_movie_soundtracks_according_john_carpenter_photo_by_kyle_cassidy_750_501_75_s

“In England, I am a horror movie director. In Germany, I am a filmmaker. In the US, I am a bum.”

– John Carpenter

John Carpenter is most well-known for the “Halloween” series and “Escape From New York,” but he has a long list of scripts he’s written. There are two sayings about audiences. One saying is “know your audience.” The other saying is “let your audience find you.” It seems John Carpenter is fully aware of his audiences, as he can be criticized in one country and be well loved in another. Whether you are writing for yourself or not, I believe there is an audience out there waiting to read or watch your work. The most important thing to do is put it all down on paper. It may be important, when you do this, to keep in mind who you are truly writing for.

In-Depth Interview – Theodore Melfi and Allison Schroeder

The Oscar’s were held recently, and there were some great screenwriters up for the awards. If you’d like to see a full list of the winners, check out our post: Oscar Winners 2017. We’ll be continuing to post our selections of in-depth interviews for the next several weeks until we go over all of the nominees.

This week we’ll be covering Theodore Melfi (writer, director and producer) and Allison Schroeder, who wrote the adapted screenplay for “Hidden Figures.” Theodore is most well known for his other films, “St. Vincent” (loved this movie) and “Winding Roads” (only trailer I could find. Sorry for the low quality). Allison is most well known for writing several TV shows, including “Side Effects,” and “Miss 2059.”

I’m providing two interviews today, because I couldn’t find one with the two of them together.

Collider Video – Hidden Figures Director/ Writer Theodore Melfi Interview

LA Times – Meet Allison Schroeder, the NASA-loving writer of ‘Hidden Figures’ who was just nominated for an Oscar

 

Friday Fun – Those Things Called Books

eb2a46ec54cb4978efed69aa30660698

Books are fun! You can learn things in them. It may hurt your brain a little, but trust me it’s totally worth it. As a writer, books can be your best friend. If I want to write the best possible story about a guy trying to make it in Hollywood, I could just make it up out of my head. It could be good, but it’d probably be much better if I read about other people’s success stories, and what they had to do to make it to the top. Another good thing could be reading about worst case scenarios, where the person became homeless because they didn’t make it. Every bit of information can help you be a better writer. When you read the best stories, it helps you write the best stories. When you read the worst stories, you’ll know what to avoid. Reading fiction and non-fiction can help a writer become more well-rounded. Fun facts are always great for conversation too. Just read. It’s good for your noggin.

To add on to this, I strongly believe it’s a good idea to seek out different types of information. Books are amazing, but don’t ignore TV, film, video games, comic books, etc. There are many ways to gain knowledge and inspiration.

Quote of the Day – Sylvia Plath

10e5c127c1ee43b002f0b2018fb5e9f5

Sylvia Plath was a famous author and poet, and lived only until she was 33. She made a major impact on the world. I remember reading her book, “The Bell Jar” in high school. I think she makes a good point in this quote. If there is a voice in you that can’t be contained, that in itself is a reason to write. When you let the voice speak, you may find the answers you’re looking for.

In-Depth Interview – Yorgos Lanthimos

<> on August 8, 2013 in Locarno, Switzerland.85a7549f393407d919a67c77636e6d40

The Oscar’s were held recently, and there were some great screenwriters up for the awards. If you’d like to see a full list of the winners, check out our post: Oscar Winners 2017. We’ll be continuing to post our selections of in-depth interviews for the next several weeks until we go over all of the nominees.

This week, we’ll be covering Yorgos Lanthimos, who wrote and directed the screenplay for “The Lobster.” Yorgos is from Greece, and is otherwise most well known for having written and directed “Dogtooth” and “Alps.”

Colin Farrell’s character gives several reasons why he wants to become a lobster. They are fertile all the time, they can live for a hundred years, they’re blue-blooded. What was your reasoning for wanting him to become a lobster and what attracted you to that?”

What exactly drew you to creating this offbeat world, that sort of resembles ours in that coupledom is praised and exalted, while being single is considered the worst thing possible?”

The Lobster gets at both sides of the issue: We see the potential upside of having someone to share your life with, but also see in the latter half of the movie an extreme version of the perils of being in a relationship. What I interpreted from that, is that it’s ideal to find the middle ground. Do you think that we as a society have a hard time finding that?”

You can find the full article here: Brow Beat: The Director of The Lobster on Satirizing the Way Society Pressures Us to Find a Mate