The Traits Of A Pro Writer

I don’t think I’ve covered this one yet. I’ve heard the best writers clean their entire apartments before writing. In fact, the longer you take to clean it, the better writer you are. There’s a pro tip, so listen well.

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Friday Fun – Characters

FF - Characters Expectation Vs. Reality

The character I’m creating is clever and witty, and says lots of funny things. He’s really smart and cool, and is well liked by almost everybody. I think I’m going to name him Jordan. Oh wait, that’s just me. Making original characters is hard. I should just write stories about where there’s just a bunch of different Jordans doing cool things….

Critics and Audiences

There’s been a lot of controversy over the differences between the scores of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and for good reasons I believe. If you don’t know what’s going on, critics love the movie and audiences feel totally mixed about it. While the critic score is lying at a fresh 93%, the audience score is sitting at much lower 54%. Rotten Tomatoes has come out and said that these ratings are very real, and nothing fishy is going on with them. This disparity can be normal in movies, but what’s really strange here is that critics love the movie far more than the audiences do. That’s not supposed to happen. It’s supposed to be the other way around… isn’t it? I’m going to leave my opinion out of this, because that’s not what I’m aiming for here. If you want to learn more about the controversy, here’s a great article that describes why people are feeling the way they are about the film:

Vox: The “backlash” against Star Wars: The Last Jedi, explained

Now, onto my point. As a writer, if you become successful, you’ll have to deal with critics and audiences. This right here could not be a better example of what I want to convey. A story is a story. The only thing that matters is that you put your heart and soul into it, and that you’ve done everything you can to make it the best you can. At the end of the day the opinions of the critics and audiences are just that, opinions. There’s a whole lot of people out there that love and hate this Star Wars movie. They’re all passionate about it, and many of their points are valid. Who’s right? Every single one of them is. A story can affect every person who experiences it in a different way. Each person might place more emphasis in a different place. It was too cute. It wasn’t cute enough. The jokes were too jokey. Did you see what happened with all that action, and the moment with the LIGHTSABER?? I want to buy this movie just so I can burn it in my fireplace. It was everything and more than I could have dreamed, I’m going to frame it.

What matters at the end of the day is that you are happy with what you’ve written. That’s something to work towards.

In-Depth Look – Lisa Joy

This week marks the last week of our In-Depth series of Emmy posts. I hope you enjoyed reading them and learning about some of the best writers of the year. This week, Lisa Joy teaches us the importance of knowing it’s never too late to get your start. She was on a solid path as a lawyer, but secretly held a love for writing.

Lisa is most well known for having written “Pushing Daisies,” “Burn Notice,” and “Westworld.” Those are some pretty amazing shows. She was recently nominated in the category of Writing for a Drama Series at the 2017 Emmy Awards. If you want to see the full list of nominees and the winners, you can find it here: Emmy Winners 2017

Learn more about how Lisa came to be a writer here: Cosmopolitan – Get That Life: How I Became the Co-Creator of Westworld