CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: 2017 Fellowship to theOffice

Looking for a writer’s sanctuary? A place where you can leave the distractions of life behind and sit down in peace to put words on the page? That’s what we offer here at theOffice – a quiet, communal workspace on the westside of Los Angeles. We have a roster of A-list screenwriters, novelists and more, but sometimes the cost of membership can be too much for up-and-coming writers. That’s why we started our free fellowship over 7 years ago and we’re thrilled once again to offer it to you.

Announcing the 2017 FREE 6-MONTH FELLOWSHIP TO THEOFFICE!

It works like this:

You send us a sample of your best piece of writing along with a short email explaining why this fellowship is right for you. Our judges select one winner who will receive 6 months of free 24/7* access to the space. This is equivalent to a Premium Membership, the highest level of membership we offer, worth upwards of $2700. The winner gets a private door code to access the space even when staff isn’t here. You wanna write at 2AM on a Wednesday night? The space is all yours. You also get all the other perks of membership including free coffee/tea, Wifi, Aeron workstations and all the peace and quiet you need to get the job done.

theOfficeThis year’s fellowship starts September 1st and goes through February 28th, 2018. It is completely free to enter. The winner will be announced the last week of August. Open to all new/aspiring/up-and-coming writers who are looking to kick their productivity into overdrive. Think of this as your own writer’s retreat right here in the city.

This year’s fellowship will be judged by 3 current members of theOffice:

Mark Cullen
A Hollywood vet and longtime member here at theOffice, Mark is the creator of numerous TV shows including Mr. Robinson (with Craig Robinson), Back in the Game (James Caan), Heist, Gary the Rat (Kelsey Grammer) and Lucky (John Corbett). He also co-wrote the feature Cop Out (with Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan).

Nicole LaPorte
Nicole is a contributing writer for Fast Company magazine, where she writes about entertainment business and technology. She was formerly a Senior West Coast reporter for Newsweek/The Daily Beast, and a monthly columnist for the New York Times Sunday Business section. She’s also the author of The Men Who Would Be King: Moguls, Movies and a Company called DreamWorks.

David Scarpa
David’s screenplay All the Money in the World made the 2015 Blacklist and is currently filming with Ridley Scott at the helm, starring Mark Wahlberg, Kevin Spacey and Michelle Williams. Other screenwriting credits include The Day the Earth Stood Still (Keanu Reeves, Jennifer Connelly, Kathy Bates) and The Last Castle (Robert Redford, James Gandolfini, Mark Ruffalo).

Pretty cool, right? Okay, so here’s what we need from you…

  1. An email with your contact information: Full name, phone, and email address. We will contact the winner via email.
  2. In the body of the email, please briefly explain why you want this fellowship and what you hope to gain from it.
  3. A 10 page pdf writing sample of your work. Attach this to the email. Your best 10 pages. Do not submit pages that need to be set up or explained. Send 10 pages that stand alone. Only pdf submissions please. All other attachments will be deleted.

Email to: theOfficeFellowship@gmail.com by August 8th, 2017. That’s it. You’re done!


theOffice3Some important points to remember:

  • Do your research on theOffice. Don’t submit if you’re not local, if you’re not sure you’ll be available, if you don’t like writing in a room with others. If you live across town and hate the commute, this isn’t right for you. If you don’t flourish in a quiet space, skip it. We want this to be of major value to the winner. Serious submissions only, please.
  • If you’ve never been to theOffice and would like to try things out before submitting, please do! We offer a FREE WEEK to all newcomers. Just be sure to call or email us first, on the day, for availability. Contact info here. More photos of the space here.
  • The fellowship is open to ALL up-and-coming writers. Submit 10 pages of your screenplay, play, short story, novel, memoir, poem, article, etc. We’ll read it all.
  • By “up-and-coming” we mean you can have no feature film credits as a writer on IMDb (short films are okay) and no more than 1 hour of television credit as a writer on IMDb. For authors, we just want to make sure you’re not someone with a three book deal and money to spare. This is for new/aspiring/struggling writers only.
  • DEADLINE TO ENTER IS AUGUST 8th, 2017. No submissions accepted past midnight PST.
  • You must have sole writing credit for the sample pages you submit. This fellowship is for one (1) free premium membership and is non-transferable.
  • If you have any questions, please either comment here, email theOfficeFellowship@gmail.com or ask us on Twitter: @theOffice_LA. theOffice staff will NOT be able to assist you with the fellowship, so please DO NOT call, email, or drop by theOffice with fellowship questions.
  • Current members of theOffice are not eligible.
  • Winner will be notified and announced by August 31st.

This is an opportunity to take your craft and career to the next level. If you are looking for a place to be inspired, a place to write with the big guns, a place to get it done, submit now. We look forward to reading your work!theOffice Exterior

*theOffice is closed to ALL members on Mondays 6PM-11PM and Saturdays 8AM-10AM due to outside rentals. Otherwise, the space is yours.

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Leslye Headland’s Writing Process

tumblr_mkktuoFy7u1r6kz6uo1_500“I feel so much that writing is like chopping wood. I’ll always say to aspiring writers, it’s time logged. Just sit down, ink out however many hours you can in the day. Turn the phone off. Just write. I usually have the script open in one window, and then in another window I have a Word document where I free write. So, as soon as those voices start to come up, like, ‘You don’t know what you’re doing. You’re an idiot. This is going to be terrible,’ I switch over to that and I start free writing. I write out all of the fears that I have and all of the negative talk that’s in my brain, and then I’ll go back to the script.”

Leslye Headland

What Makes Writers Write?

Encouragement from a community of writers.

Coffee.

Holding ourselves accountable. Watching a habit form.

An idea that we’re really, really excited about.

Woman lays in hammock writing

Being in a beautiful, serene setting.

The impending deadline of incredible awards and fellowships.

Getting really positive feedback from someone who’s opinion we respect.

Getting really negative feedback and writing just to prove that harsh criticism won’t stop us.

Being surrounded by people who want to be productive just as much as we do.

tumblr_lyrd2vvgNU1qccj2e

Clearing your mind.

Seeing a film or reading a book that inspires us.

Finding the perfect background music.

Overhearing a hilarious conversation in a coffee shop.

Freewriting. A mind dump.

We’re fed up with NOT writing.

Seeing a new part of the world. Meeting a completely unique individual.

What else?

The War of Art

Here are some of the best quote’s from Steven Pressfield‘s excellent book, The War of Art.

images“If you find yourself asking yourself (and your friends), “Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?” chances are you are. The counterfeit innovator is wildly self-confident. The real one is scared to death.”

“Are you paralyzed with fear? That’s a good sign. Fear is good. Like self-doubt, fear is an indicator. Fear tells us what we have to do. Remember one rule of thumb: the more scared we are of a work or calling, the more sure we can be that we have to do it.”

tumblr_mkonybncB51qlzvrgo1_1280“The most pernicious aspect of procrastination is that it can become a habit. We don’t just put off our lives today; we put them off till our deathbed. Never forget: This very moment, we can change our lives. There never was a moment, and never will be, when we are without the power to alter our destiny. This second we can turn the tables on Resistance. This second, we can sit down and do our work.”

Links for Writers: Fun Stuff to Read this Week

The Electric Typewriter // It appears that someone put a lot of time into this compilation of “articles and essays by the world’s best journalists and writers.” A lot of good stuff to be found here.

That Way We’re All Writing Now by Clive Thompson // You’ll see a lot tweets and status updates starting with the phrase, “That moment when…” “Or that awkward moment when…” It’s not technically a sentence. Where does it come from, and why is it so effective, or at least, so popular?

How to be a writer by Paul Duginski, Jon Schleuss, Joy Press and Carolyn Kellogg // Here’s cute “game” the LA Times created to take you on the path of the life of a writer. Roll the dice!

Did a Human or a Computer Write This? // Take the quiz – guess which sentences were written by humans and which were written by computers. The scary part… it’s really hard to tell.

Watch Me Write This Article by Chadwick Matlin // This article looks into the app, Draftback, who’s creator, “hacked Google Docs to play documents back to their authors, materializing on the screen with every stutter-step inherent to the writing process… Draftback can reach deep into the archives of any Google Doc you have editing rights to, make sense of all that writing and rewriting you innocuously poured into it, and beam it right back to you, backspaces and all.” It’s an interesting read, and at the end, the author allows us to see the playback of entire writing process behind this article.

Lessons learnt from a year of writing by Colin Walker // This fellow wrote every day for a year and lived to tell the tale. Check out what he learned from the experience, and where he’s at now. I think there are some fresh perspectives in here.

Another video from the Academy’s Creative Spark series. Watch Dustin Lance Black’s incredible & exhaustive writing process. He is relentless it is inspiring.

Writing Quote of the Day

david_sedaris_detail“I started writing one afternoon when I was twenty, and ever since then I have written every day. At first I had to force myself. Then it became part of my identity, and I did it without thinking. It helped to have jobs that involved running around, pushing things like dish carts and wheelbarrows. It would be hard to sit at a desk all day, and then come to sit at another desk.

Also, it helps to abandon hope. If I sit at my computer, determined to write a New Yorker story I won’t get beyond the first sentence. It’s better to put no pressure on it. What would happen if I followed the previous sentence with this one, I’ll think. If the eighth draft is torture, the first should be fun. At least if you’re writing humor.”

David Sedaris